Car Title Loans in Jerome Arizona AZ in 15 Minutes, Specializing in Autos and Trucks - One Way Title Loans
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Car Title Loans in Jerome, Arizona

- Jerome Auto Title Loans Specialist.

Do you need cash now? One Way Car Title Loans serves the Jerome, Arizona area. You can borrow up to $20,000 in 15 minutes.* You can use the equity in your car to get a car title loan in 15 minutes or less.*

Got bad credit or no credit? Don't worry! Got a repossession or past bankruptcy? Don't worry! NO PROBLEM at One Way Title Loans! Apply now for an instant quote on how much you can borrow.

CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-723-8813
Open 7 Days a Week 9AM to 9PM

One Way Title Loans can fund you immediately because we're the direct lender so there is no red tape. We have the lowest rates with no prepayment penalties. We will even go to your work or your home to hand deliver the check. We also take care of the DMV paperwork so you don't have to wait in line all day. Call us or apply online now for an instant 3 minute* approval on your auto title loan.

What is a Title Loan?
A car title loan is a fast way to borrow money using the equity in your paid off vehicle as collateral for a loan. Call us now for instant approval.

Do I need good credit to get a loan?
No, your credit history is not a factor. Your approval is based upon your vehicle's equity, vehicle's condition and your income.

How much can I borrow?
You can borrow anywhere from $2600 to $15000 depending on the wholesale value of your vehicle and your income. Please fill out the Application to see how much you qualify for.

How long does it take to get a car title loan?
Your money will be ready in 15 minutes or less.* Many car title loan companies advertise 15 minutes or less but in reality take much longer, even 24-48 hours. Some competitors request you to go to DMV to add them as lien holder.

Why choose a car title loan over a bank loan?
Most people choose car title loans because they do not qualify for traditional bank loans. Car title loans are also processed more quickly and have fewer requirements than bank loans.

Contact us today at 1-888-723-8813.


About Jerome

Jerome is a town in the Black Hills of Yavapai County, in the State of Arizona. Founded in the late 19th century on Cleopatra Hill, overlooking the Verde Valley, it is more than 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above sea level. It is about 100 miles (160 km) north of Phoenix along State Route 89A between Sedona and Prescott. Supported in its heyday by rich copper mines, it was home to more than 10,000 people in the 1920s. As of the 2010 census, its population was 444.

The town owes its existence mainly to two ore bodies that formed about 1.75 billion years ago along a ring fault in the caldera of an undersea volcano. Tectonic plate movements, plate collisions, uplift, deposition, erosion, and other geologic processes eventually exposed the tip of one of the ore bodies and pushed the other close to the surface, both near Jerome. In the late 19th century, the United Verde Mine, developed by William A. Clark, extracted ore bearing copper, gold, silver, and other metals from the larger of the two. The United Verde Extension (UVX) Mine, owned by James Douglas, Jr., depended on the other huge deposit. In total, the copper deposits discovered in the vicinity of Jerome were among the richest ever found in any time or place.

Jerome made news in 1917, when strikes involving the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) led to the expulsion at gunpoint of about 60 IWW members, who were loaded on a cattle car and shipped west. Production at the mines, always subject to fluctuations for various reasons, boomed during World War I, fell thereafter, rose again, then fell again during and after the Great Depression. As the ore deposits became exhausted, the mines closed, and the population dwindled to fewer than 100 by the mid-1950s. Efforts to save the town from oblivion succeeded when residents turned to tourism and retail sales. Jerome became a National Historic Landmark in 1967. In the early 21st century, Jerome has art galleries, coffee houses, restaurants, and a state park and local museum devoted to mining history.

Jerome is in Arizona's Black Hills and within the Prescott National Forest at an elevation of more than 5,000 feet (1,500 m). Woodchute Wilderness is about 3 miles (5 km) west of Jerome, and Mingus Mountain, at 7,726 feet (2,355 m) above sea level, is about 4 miles (6 km) south of town. Jerome State Historic Park is in the town itself. Bitter Creek, a tributary of the Verde River, flows intermittently through Jerome.

Most of Cleopatra Hill, the rock formation upon which Jerome was built, is 1.75 billion (1,750 million) years old. Created by a massive caldera eruption in Precambrian seas south of what later became northern Arizona, the Cleopatra tuff was then part of a small tectonic plate that was moving toward the proto-North American continent. After the eruption, cold sea water entered Earth's crust through cracks caused by the eruption. Heated by rising magma to perhaps 660 °F (349 °C), the water was forced upward again, chemically altering the rocks it encountered and becoming rich in dissolved minerals. When the hot solution emerged from a hydrothermal vent at the bottom of the ocean, its dissolved minerals solidified and fell to the sea floor. The accumulating sulfide deposits from two such vents formed the ore bodies, the United Verde and the UVX, most important to Jerome 1.75 billion years later.

To encourage tourism, the town's leaders sought National Historic Landmark status for Jerome; it was granted by the federal government in 1967. In 1962, the heirs of Jimmy Douglas donated the Douglas mansion, above the UVX mine site, to the State of Arizona, which used it to create Jerome State Historic Park. By sponsoring music festivals, historic-homes tours, celebrations, and races, the community succeeded in attracting visitors and new businesses, which in the 21st century include art galleries, craft stores, coffee houses, and restaurants.

The makeup of early Jerome differed greatly from the 21st-century version of the town. The original mining claims were filed by Whites, but as the mines were developed, workers of many nationalities arrived. Among these were people of Irish, Chinese, Italian, and Slavic origin who came to Jerome in the late 19th century. By the time of World War I, Mexican nationals were arriving in large numbers, and census figures suggest that in 1930 about 60 percent of the town's residents were Latino. This statistic is supported by mining company records showing that about 57 percent of the UVX workers were Mexican nationals in 1931 and that foreign-born and Spanish-surnamed workers accounted for about 77 percent of the UVX work force.

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