Car Title Loans in Peoria Arizona AZ in 15 Minutes, Specializing in Autos and Trucks - One Way Title Loans
Open Late Cash in 15 minutes
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Car Title Loans in Peoria, Arizona

- Peoria Auto Title Loans Specialist.

Do you need cash now? One Way Car Title Loans serves the Peoria, Arizona area. You can borrow up to $20,000 in 15 minutes.* You can use the equity in your car to get a car title loan in 15 minutes or less.*

Got bad credit or no credit? Don't worry! Got a repossession or past bankruptcy? Don't worry! NO PROBLEM at One Way Title Loans! Apply now for an instant quote on how much you can borrow.

CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-723-8813
Open 7 Days a Week 9AM to 9PM

One Way Title Loans can fund you immediately because we're the direct lender so there is no red tape. We have the lowest rates with no prepayment penalties. We will even go to your work or your home to hand deliver the check. We also take care of the DMV paperwork so you don't have to wait in line all day. Call us or apply online now for an instant 3 minute* approval on your auto title loan.

What is a Title Loan?
A car title loan is a fast way to borrow money using the equity in your paid off vehicle as collateral for a loan. Call us now for instant approval.

Do I need good credit to get a loan?
No, your credit history is not a factor. Your approval is based upon your vehicle's equity, vehicle's condition and your income.

How much can I borrow?
You can borrow anywhere from $2600 to $15000 depending on the wholesale value of your vehicle and your income. Please fill out the Application to see how much you qualify for.

How long does it take to get a car title loan?
Your money will be ready in 15 minutes or less.* Many car title loan companies advertise 15 minutes or less but in reality take much longer, even 24-48 hours. Some competitors request you to go to DMV to add them as lien holder.

Why choose a car title loan over a bank loan?
Most people choose car title loans because they do not qualify for traditional bank loans. Car title loans are also processed more quickly and have fewer requirements than bank loans.

Contact us today at 1-888-723-8813.


About Peoria

Peoria /piˈɔːriə/ is a city in Maricopa and Yavapai counties in the U.S. state of Arizona. Most of the city is located in Maricopa County, while a tiny portion in the north is in Yavapai County. It is a major suburb of Phoenix. According to 2010 Census Bureau releases, the population of the city is 154,065. Peoria is currently the sixth largest city in Arizona for land area, and the ninth largest for population. It was named after Peoria, Illinois. (The word peoria is a corruption of the Illini word for “prairie fire”.) Peoria is now larger in population than its namesake. It is the spring training home of the San Diego Padres and Seattle Mariners who share the Peoria Sports Complex. In July 2008, Money magazine listed Peoria in its "Top 100 Places to Live".

Peoria sits on flat gently sloping desert terrain in the Salt River Valley, and extends into the foothills of the mountains to the north. Seasonal rainfall and runoff from mountain snowmelt filled the Salt River, at times flooding the valley and wiping out months of backbreaking labor. If the area was to become habitable and productive all year, the cycle of flood and drought had to be replaced with a reliable supply of water that could be controlled year-round. The pioneers turned to irrigation. In 1868 John W. “Jack” Swilling organized a group of men to dig the first modern irrigation ditch in the Salt River Valley. Their success enticed more people to settle in the area and reap the benefits of a revitalized irrigation system.

Peoria continues to grow successfully. In 1999 most of the land around Lake Pleasant Regional Park was annexed into the city. Peoria has gained a world-class educational and cultural destination, the Challenger Space Center of Arizona. Also in 2007 the city completed the Peoria Center for the Performing Arts. Today most of the city’s growth is taking place in northern and northwestern Peoria with many infill projects occurring in Old Town and southern Peoria.

The city in 2003 created a Drought Contingency Plan, and the Arizona Department of Water awarded Peoria as having Assured Water Supply, a designation that lasts until 2010. Additionally, Peoria became the first city in Arizona to use water availability rather than land mass for growth projections. In 1999 the Desert Lands Conservation Master Plan was adopted, and in May 2001 Peoria’s General Plan- the city’s blueprint for future growth and development-was approved by voters. In 2004, Peoria planners were creating a Desert Lands Conservation ordinance, which deals with hillside development, protection of native plants, and building setbacks from washes and other natural features. It provides a more comprehensive perspective when looking at development, considering the overall impact and seeking to provide the greatest amount of beneficial and conservation for both the public and the environment. Through separate development agreements, the city has managed to designate over 4,000 acres (16 km2) of mountain preserves and open space to be enjoyed by all of Peoria.

Between 1990 and 2000 Peoria was the fifth fastest growing city in the United States with a population of over 100,000, increasing in population 114 percent. In 2004 Peoria was home to over 130,000 residents spread out over 170 square miles (440 km2). Growth, however, does pay for growth. Peoria charges impact fees to developers and requires economic impact analyses on major development projects.

Peoria's identity is more related to resort and leisure living than the past, as that type of lifestyle migrates from the northeast Valley to Peoria. Peoria’s economic plan focuses on establishing the new Loop 303 freeway corridor as an industrial, commercial, mixed development use and less on traditional residential development. In July 2008 Money Magazine listed Peoria in the Top 100 Places to Live.

The street system of Peoria is based on the city of Phoenix traditional grid system, with most roads oriented either north-south or east-west. The zero point is in downtown Phoenix at Central Avenue and Washington Street. Since Peoria is always west of zero, its north-south numbered Streets are Avenues. Major arterial streets are spaced one mile (1.6 km) apart (until you are north of roughly Pinnacle Peak Road). The one-mile (1.6 km) blocks are divided into approximately 800 house numbers although this varies. 83rd Avenue, being 8300 West. The numbers in Phoenix start at Central Avenue at a half-mile increment, going west to 7th Avenue ½ mile from Central but considered the arterial. Then the numbers go to 19th (1 mile from 7th), 27th, 35th, 43rd, 51st, 59th, 67th (in many places Peoria’s eastern border), 75th, 83rd, 91st, 99th, and so on. In northern Peoria streets are more curvilinear and begin to not follow the north-south route due to rivers, mountains, and terrain challenges. The northern end of the city does still follow the alignment theory and still has blocking according to Phoenix.

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