Car Title Loans in Tombstone Arizona AZ in 15 Minutes, Specializing in Autos and Trucks - One Way Title Loans
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Car Title Loans in Tombstone, Arizona

- Tombstone Auto Title Loans Specialist.

Do you need cash now? One Way Car Title Loans serves the Tombstone, Arizona area. You can borrow up to $20,000 in 15 minutes.* You can use the equity in your car to get a car title loan in 15 minutes or less.*

Got bad credit or no credit? Don't worry! Got a repossession or past bankruptcy? Don't worry! NO PROBLEM at One Way Title Loans! Apply now for an instant quote on how much you can borrow.

CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-723-8813
Open 7 Days a Week 9AM to 9PM

One Way Title Loans can fund you immediately because we're the direct lender so there is no red tape. We have the lowest rates with no prepayment penalties. We will even go to your work or your home to hand deliver the check. We also take care of the DMV paperwork so you don't have to wait in line all day. Call us or apply online now for an instant 3 minute* approval on your auto title loan.

What is a Title Loan?
A car title loan is a fast way to borrow money using the equity in your paid off vehicle as collateral for a loan. Call us now for instant approval.

Do I need good credit to get a loan?
No, your credit history is not a factor. Your approval is based upon your vehicle's equity, vehicle's condition and your income.

How much can I borrow?
You can borrow anywhere from $2600 to $15000 depending on the wholesale value of your vehicle and your income. Please fill out the Application to see how much you qualify for.

How long does it take to get a car title loan?
Your money will be ready in 15 minutes or less.* Many car title loan companies advertise 15 minutes or less but in reality take much longer, even 24-48 hours. Some competitors request you to go to DMV to add them as lien holder.

Why choose a car title loan over a bank loan?
Most people choose car title loans because they do not qualify for traditional bank loans. Car title loans are also processed more quickly and have fewer requirements than bank loans.

Contact us today at 1-888-723-8813.


About Tombstone

Tombstone is a historic western city in Cochise County, Arizona, United States, founded in 1879 by Ed Schieffelin in what was then Pima County, Arizona Territory. It was one of the last wide-open frontier boomtowns in the American Old West. The town prospered from about 1877 to 1890, during which the town's mines produced USD $40 to $85 million in silver bullion, the largest productive silver district in Arizona. Its population grew from 100 to around 14,000 in less than 7 years. It is best known as the site of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and draws most of its revenue from tourism.

Within two years of its founding, although far distant from any other metropolitan city, Tombstone boasted a bowling alley, four churches, an ice house, a school, two banks, three newspapers, and an ice cream parlor, alongside 110 saloons, 14 gambling halls, and numerous dancing halls and brothels. All of these were situated among and on top of a large number of dirty, hardscrabble mines. The gentlemen and ladies of Tombstone attended operas presented by visiting acting troupes at the Schieffelin Hall opera house, while the miners and cowboys saw shows at the Bird Cage Theatre, "the wildest, wickedest night spot between Basin Street and the Barbary Coast."

Under the surface were tensions that grew into deadly conflict. The mining capitalists and townspeople were largely Republicans from the Northern states. Many of the ranchers in the area were Confederate sympathizers and Democrats. The booming city was only 30 miles (48 km) from the U.S./Mexico border and was an open market for beef stolen from ranches in Sonora, Mexico by a loosely organized band of outlaws known as The Cowboys. The Earp brothers—Virgil, Wyatt, Morgan and Warren Earp—arrived in December 1879 and the summer of 1880. They had ongoing conflicts with Ike and Billy Clanton, Frank and Tom McLaury, and other Cowboys members. The Cowboys repeatedly threatened the Earps over many months until the conflict escalated into a confrontation that turned into a shootout, the now-famous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

In the mid-1880s, the silver mines penetrated the water table and the mining companies made significant investments in specialized pumps. A fire in 1886 destroyed the Grand Central hoist and pumping plant, and it was unprofitable to rebuild the costly pumps. The city nearly became a ghost town only saved from that end because it was the Cochise County seat until 1929. The city's population dwindled to a low of 646 in 1910 but in 2010 the population was 1,380.

Mining was an easy task at Tombstone in the early days, ore being rich and close to the surface. One man could pull out ore equal to what three men produced elsewhere. Some residents of Tombstone became quite wealthy and spent considerable money during its boom years. Tombstone's first newspaper, the Nugget, was established in the fall of 1879. The Tombstone Epitaph was founded on May 1, 1880. As the fastest growing boomtown in the American southwest, the silver industry and attendant wealth attracted many professionals and merchants who brought their wives and families. With them came churches and ministers. They brought a Victorian sensibility and became the town's elite. Many citizens of Tombstone dressed well and up-to-date fashion could be seen in this growing mining town. Visitors expressed their amazement at the quality and diversity of products that were readily available in the area. The men who worked the mines were largely European immigrants. The Chinese did the town's laundry and provided other services. The Cowboys ran the countryside and stole cattle from haciendas across the international border in Sonora, Mexico.

Currently, tourism and western memorabilia are the main commercial enterprises; a July 2005 CNN article notes that Tombstone receives approximately 450,000 tourist visitors each year. This is about 300 tourists/year for each permanent resident. In contrast to its heyday, when it featured saloons open 24 hours and numerous houses of prostitution, Tombstone is now a staid community with few businesses open late. Tombstone and surrounding areas have a variety of lodging options, restaurants, and attractions. The town is located near other historic sites of interest, including Bisbee and the San Pedro Riparian area. Tombstone is a short drive away from Sierra Vista, which is considered the shopping hub of Cochise County.

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